Bound sale for the Promised Land: Harriet Tubman: Portrait of an outlet sale American Hero online

Bound sale for the Promised Land: Harriet Tubman: Portrait of an outlet sale American Hero online

Bound sale for the Promised Land: Harriet Tubman: Portrait of an outlet sale American Hero online
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The essential, “richly researched”* biography of Harriet Tubman, revealing a complex woman who “led a remarkable life, one that her race, her sex, and her origins make all the more extraordinary” (*The New York Times Book Review).
 
Harriet Tubman is one of the giants of American history—a fearless visionary who led scores of her fellow slaves to freedom and battled courageously behind enemy lines during the Civil War. Now, in this magnificent biography, historian Kate Clifford Larson gives us a powerful, intimate, meticulously detailed portrait of Tubman and her times. Drawing from a trove of new documents and sources as well as extensive genealogical data, Larson presents Harriet Tubman as a complete human being—brilliant, shrewd, deeply religious, and passionate in her pursuit of freedom. A true American hero, Tubman was also a woman who loved, suffered, and sacrificed.
 
Praise for Bound for the Promised Land
 
“[ Bound for the Promised Land] appropriately reads like fiction, for Tubman’s exploits required such intelligence, physical stamina and pure fearlessness that only a very few would have even contemplated the feats that she actually undertook. . . . Larson captures Tubman’s determination and seeming imperviousness to pain and suffering, coupled with an extraordinary selflessness and caring for others.” The Seattle Times
 
“Essential for those interested in Tubman and her causes . . . Larson does an especially thorough job of . . . uncovering relevant documents, some of them long hidden by history and neglect.” The Plain Dealer
 
“Larson has captured Harriet Tubman’s clandestine nature . . . reading Ms. Larson made me wonder if Tubman is not, in fact, the greatest spy this country has ever produced.” The New York Sun

Review

“Compelling . . . memorable . . . Tubman [takes] her rightful place as a visionary and a selfless leader.” USA Today
 
“It is a risky business to tamper with a national icon and trickier still to convey the full dimension of the individual behind the legend. But Kate Clifford Larson has accomplished both in her brilliant biography.” Smithsonian Magazine
 
“Epic . . . written with passion for the subject and meticulous attention to detail . . . [Larson’s] book is nothing less than an encyclopedic chronicle of a rip-roaring American adventure.” The San Antonio Express-News
 
“Skillfully written . . . Larson’s book includes several maps that help readers understand the workings of the Underground Railroad. . . . Larson present[s] a richly drawn portrait of Tubman as a deeply spiritual woman, a ‘Moses’ and ‘Joan of Ark’ as contemporaries were wont to describe her.” The Charlotte Observer
 
“An engrossing biography of an extraordinary woman.”— Green Bay Press–Gazette
 
“Mesmerizing and exceedingly well-documented . . . As Larson recounts in absorbing incident after absorbing incident, the brilliant Harriet Tubman was courageous, witty, and as determined as a body could be.” Bay State Banner
 
“Historian Kate Clifford Larson gives Tubman the powerful, intimate, meticulously detailed life she deserves.” The Herald American
 
“A marvel of impressive scholarship and lucid prose.” The Seattle Times
 
“Although Tubman’s life story has been told before, it has never been told in such a comprehensive way.” —(Salt Lake City) Deseret Morning News
 
“Larson’s thorough and readable effort is a must for armchair historians who haven’t looked at Tubman in a while, if ever.” Cape Cod Times

From the Author

Read BOUND FOR THE PROMISED LAND and SEE the movie HARRIET!!

From the Inside Flap

Harriet Tubman is one of the giants of American history—a fearless visionary who led scores of her fellow slaves to freedom and battled courageously behind enemy lines during the Civil War. And yet in the nine decades since her death, next to nothing has been written about this extraordinary woman aside from juvenile biographies. The truth about Harriet Tubman has become lost inside a legend woven of racial and gender stereotypes. Now at last, in this long-overdue biography, historian Kate Clifford Larson gives Harriet Tubman the powerful, intimate, meticulously detailed life she deserves.

Drawing from a trove of new documents and sources as well extensive genealogical research, Larson reveals Tubman as a complex woman— brilliant, shrewd, deeply religious, and passionate in her pursuit of freedom. The descendant of the vibrant, matrilineal Asanti people of the West African Gold Coast, Tubman was born into slavery on the Eastern Shore of Maryland but refused to spend her life in bondage. While still a young woman she embarked on a perilous journey of self-liberation—and then, having won her own freedom, she returned again and again to liberate family and friends, tapping into the Underground Railroad.

Yet despite her success, her celebrity, her close ties with Northern politicians and abolitionists, Tubman suffered crushing physical pain and emotional setbacks. Stripping away myths and misconceptions, Larson presents stunning new details about Tubman’s accomplishments, personal life, and influence, including her relationship with Frederick Douglass, her involvement with John Brown’s raid on Harpers Ferry, and revelations about a young woman who may have been Tubman’s daughter. Here too are Tubman’s twilight years after the war, when she worked for women’s rights and in support of her fellow blacks, and when racist politicians and suffragists marginalized her contribution.

Harriet Tubman, her life and her work, remain an inspiration to all who value freedom. Now, thanks to Larson’s breathtaking biography, we can finally appreciate Tubman as a complete human being—an American hero, yes, but also a woman who loved, suffered, and sacrificed. Bound for the Promised Land is a magnificent work of biography, history, and truth telling.


From the Hardcover edition.

From the Back Cover

Harriet Tubman is one of the giants of American history--a fearless visionary who led scores of her fellow slaves to freedom and battled courageously behind enemy lines during the Civil War. And yet in the nine decades since her death, next to nothing has been written about this extraordinary woman aside from juvenile biographies. The truth about Harriet Tubman has become lost inside a legend woven of racial and gender stereotypes. Now at last, in this long-overdue biography, historian Kate Clifford Larson gives Harriet Tubman the powerful, intimate, meticulously detailed life she deserves.
Drawing from a trove of new documents and sources as well extensive genealogical research, Larson reveals Tubman as a complex woman-- brilliant, shrewd, deeply religious, and passionate in her pursuit of freedom. The descendant of the vibrant, matrilineal Asanti people of the West African Gold Coast, Tubman was born into slavery on the Eastern Shore of Maryland but refused to spend her life in bondage. While still a young woman she embarked on a perilous journey of self-liberation--and then, having won her own freedom, she returned again and again to liberate family and friends, tapping into the Underground Railroad.
Yet despite her success, her celebrity, her close ties with Northern politicians and abolitionists, Tubman suffered crushing physical pain and emotional setbacks. Stripping away myths and misconceptions, Larson presents stunning new details about Tubman''s accomplishments, personal life, and influence, including her relationship with Frederick Douglass, her involvement with John Brown''s raid on Harpers Ferry, and revelations about a young woman who may have been Tubman''s daughter.Here too are Tubman''s twilight years after the war, when she worked for women''s rights and in support of her fellow blacks, and when racist politicians and suffragists marginalized her contribution.
Harriet Tubman, her life and her work, remain an inspiration to all who value freedom. Now, thanks to Larson''s breathtaking biography, we can finally appreciate Tubman as a complete human being--an American hero, yes, but also a woman who loved, suffered, and sacrificed. "Bound for the Promised Land is a magnificent work of biography, history, and truth telling.

"From the Hardcover edition.

About the Author

Kate Clifford Larson is a New York Times Best Selling author of three critically acclaimed biographies: Rosemary; The Hidden Kennedy Daughter; Bound for the Promised Land: Harriet Tubman, Portrait of an American Hero; and The Assassin''s Accomplice: Mary Surratt and the Plot to Kill Abraham Lincoln. Her current project Walk With Me: A Biography of Fannie Lou Hamer is due out in 2021. She has spent years researching the life and times of Harriet Tubman, and has served as a consultant and interpretive specialist for numerous museum and public history initiatives focusing on this great American Hero - including consulting for the HARRIET movie featuring award winning Cynthia Erivo!

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

CHAPTER 1

LIFE ON THE CHESAPEAKE IN BLACK AND WHITE


When Harriet Tubman fled her dead master’s family in 1849, she was not the only slave from the Eastern Shore of Maryland racing for liberty. In 1850 a total of 279 runaway slaves earned Maryland the dubious distinction of leading the slave states in successfully executed escapes. The motivations for running away are no mystery; however, in many cases the methods of escape remain unknown even to this day. Despite stepped-up efforts in Maryland and other southern states to thwart escapes during the ten years before the Civil War, some slaves did marshal the strength and courage to take their liberty. But few returned to the land of their enslavers, risking capture and reenslavement, even lynching, to help others seek their own emancipation.

How did Tubman successfully escape bondage in Dorchester County, and how did she manage to return many times to lead out family and friends? Not merely the recipient of white abolitionist support, Tubman was the beneficiary of, and a participant in, an African American community that challenged the control of white Marylanders, from the earliest Africans brought from Africa to the outbreak of the Civil War.

Tubman’s story begins several decades before her birth with a complicated set of interrelationships, black and white, enslaved and free, of several generations of families living on the Eastern Shore of Maryland. As historian Mechal Sobel describes it, this was a “world they made together.”


Dorchester County lies between two rivers, the Choptank to the north and the Nanticoke to the south and east, and extends from the Chesapeake Bay to the Delaware state line, encompassing almost 400,000 acres of dense forest full of oak, hickory, pine, walnut, and sweet gum; marshes and waterways; and extensive farmland. Numerous navigable rivers and creeks crisscross the county, offering access to trade and suitable sites for shipbuilding. The flat terrain provides abundant tillable lands for tobacco, wheat, corn, fruit, and other agricultural products, and before modern times, the vast supply of oyster shells helped keep soils fertile.

The Choptank River rises near the Delaware line, flowing south between Caroline and Talbot Counties and on to Dorchester County, finally emptying into the Chesapeake. In the nineteenth century, the river remained navigable for nearly forty miles upstream from the Chesapeake Bay. Dorchester’s southern border, the Nanticoke River, was navigable throughout its course from Seaford, Delaware, to the Chesapeake; the town of Vienna served as its port of entry and be- came a major trading center during the early nineteenth century, providing bay access to neighboring Somerset County and southwestern Delaware.

It was to this landscape that Harriet Tubman’s African ancestors were forcibly brought to labor in servitude to white masters. Enslavement of Africans in Maryland, and the laws and regulations that codified slavery’s existence, evolved slowly over a hundred-year period. Until the early eighteenth century white indentured servitude was common, particularly on the Eastern Shore. Some planters had both slaves and indentured servants; by the 1730s and 1740s, however, shipments of black captives from Africa to the Americas had increased dramatically. Numerous laws were enacted relating to ownership of slaves, including ones specifying that any children born to an enslaved woman would carry the status of the mother, with ownership remaining with the slave woman’s owner, even if the father was a free black or a white man.

Thus Tubman’s story begins with the history of some of the white families who claimed ownership of her and her family. The detailed records of the lives of the white families who enslaved Tubman, her family, and her friends, demonstrate the sharp contrast between the lives of whites and blacks, lives intimately entwined yet irreconcilably different. Following these white families’ lives as closely as the remaining records allow reveals the lives of their enslaved people, bringing to life the web of community into which Tubman was born. The white Pattisons, the Thompsons, the Stewarts, and the Brodesses played key roles in the lives of Tubman’s family. On the Eastern Shore of Maryland, most black people, slave and free alike, moved around according to the land ownership patterns, occupational choices, and living arrangements of the region’s white families. Out of necessity, many black families maintained familial and community ties throughout a wide geographic area. Family separations were not always precipitated by sale; some whites owned (or rented) land and farms across great distances, requiring a shifting of their enslaved and hired black labor force at varying times throughout the year, or at various times over a period of decades when new land had been purchased and the cycle of clearing and es- tablishing new farms began. This pattern of intraregional movement forced families and friends (both black and white) to create communication and travel networks in order to maintain ties with family and community. These complicated networks made it possible for Tubman to become one of the rare individuals capable of executing successful and daring rescues repeatedly.

A devastating fire at the Dorchester County courthouse, set by an unknown arsonist in May 1852, destroyed a great portion of Dorchester County’s historical records. Because few records survived from before 1852, piecing together the nature of black and white relationships in Dorchester County can be done in only a limited way. For instance, we do not know the names of all the slaves owned by Edward Brodess, Harriet Tubman’s owner, nor all of those owned by Anthony Thompson, the owner of Tubman’s father, Ben Ross, from the first half of the nineteenth century.

Several documents did survive the fire: the records of the Orphans Court from 1847 to 1852 were saved because the clerk of the court brought the logbook home to work on it over the weekend. This quirk of fate secured a five-year segment of history important to revealing details of Tubman’s life and of those black and white families who were part of her community. Other records were saved, too: the books listing manumissions, freedom papers, and many chattel records (where slave sales were recorded) were preserved, providing important information about the black community and vital genealogical data for many families in the area. District court cases, heard at the appeals court located in neighboring Talbot County, were recorded at the state level, as were most land transactions, thereby preserving some information from the colonial era and the early republic. Fortunately, these court records contain some of the most dramatic documentation available detailing Harriet Tubman’s life in slavery.

Reaching Beyond the Grave: The Legacy of a Patriarch


In 1791 Atthow Pattison, the patriarch of a long-established Eastern Shore family, sat down to contemplate his legacy to his children and grandchildren. A Revolutionary War veteran, a modest farmer, and an even more modest slaveholder, Pattison could proudly trace his roots in Dorchester County back at least a century. Intermarrying for generations, the Pattisons and other Eastern Shore families consolidated their control over vast tracts of dense timberland, rich marshlands, and productive farms.

Standing at his front door, Pattison could view much of his approximately 265-acre farm, situated on the east side of the Little Blackwater River, near its confluence with the larger Blackwater River. From the wharf in front of his home Pattison probably shipped tobacco, timber, and grain, destined for England and other markets, and received goods originating from the West Indies or England as well as other trading points in New England and along the Chesapeake.

After dividing tracts of land, including his home plantation, and arranging for payments to his grandchildren when they came of age, Atthow bequeathed his remaining slaves and livestock to his surviving daughter, Elizabeth, and her children, Gourney Crow, James, Elizabeth, Achsah, and Mary Pattison, and to his son-in-law, Ezekiel Keene, and his children, Samuel and Anna Keene. Elizabeth, in keeping with her father’s implicit understanding that his children marry “in the family,” had married her cousin William Pattison, and they lived on a nearby plantation. Atthow’s second daughter, Mary, had married her cousin Ezekiel Keene and moved to a farm south of Atthow’s land, though she was dead by the time the will was written.

When Atthow Pattison died in January 1797 he gave to his granddaughter Mary Pattison one enslaved girl named “Rittia and her increase until she and they arrive to forty five years of age.” This phrase, limiting Rit’s and her children’s terms of service to forty-five years, provided for Rit’s eventual manumission, or freedom, from slavery. Maryland manumissions had taken place even in the earliest days of slavery. Never an informal procedure, manumissions were taken quite seriously and were often recorded in land records (as deeds) for each county. Some slaves were able to earn enough money to buy their own freedom, and on occasion slaves sued for their freedom, some eventually prevailing. In 1752 Maryland passed a law restricting manumission by will to slaves “sound in body and mind, capable of labor and not over fifty years of age,” so as to prevent slaveholders or estates from avoiding responsibility for the care and maintenance of “disabled and superannuated slaves.” Manumitting slaves was illegal if the grant of manumission was written in part “during the last fatal illness of the master,” or if the freeing of slaves affected the ability of creditors to settle their claims against the estate of the deceased. This legislation, it was hoped, would slow the increasing number of deathbed manumissions and hold slaveholders more accountable for the support and maintenance of indigent slaves.

Limiting Rit’s term of service lowered her market value to Pattison’s heirs if they were inclined to sell her after gaining possession of her. No doubt Pattison was aware of this, but he may have been influenced by the spirit of the times. On the Eastern Shore, as elsewhere in the new nation, a complex movement was emerging, both religious and secular, that spurred a marked increase in manumissions during the 1790s. While elite families still maintained much control, wealth could be achieved readily with the expanding production of wheat and other grains for export markets, providing viable roads to prosperity for entrepreneurial families in Dorchester and the surrounding counties. The rise of intensive grain agriculture and timber harvesting transformed work patterns on the Eastern Shore. Tobacco production required a year-round labor force, but grain agriculture did not. While timber harvesting could be carried on throughout the year, it also required continuous acquisition of land once one lot had been cut, and it demanded a predominantly male labor force. These factors, among others, altered the nature of black slavery and freedom on the Eastern Shore by 1800; on one hand, free black labor became, to some extent, a more attractive economic alternative to owning slaves, while on the other hand, some white slaveholders found it lucrative to sell off their excess slaves.

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Top reviews from the United States

C. Ellen Connally
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
If you have to select of biography of Harriet Tubman, this is the one to select
Reviewed in the United States on July 14, 2016
There have been many biographies of Harriet Tubman. Since Tubman herself was illiterate, she was never able to tell her own story. This left the telling of her story to others who often got it wrong. As a result, there have been many false depictions of her life and many... See more
There have been many biographies of Harriet Tubman. Since Tubman herself was illiterate, she was never able to tell her own story. This left the telling of her story to others who often got it wrong. As a result, there have been many false depictions of her life and many fictional accounts, especially for juvenile readers. Early biographers included inaccurate accounts of life, especially as it relates to the number of trips that she made to rescue enslaved people and the actual number of people that she rescued. This has created an image of Tubman that is at times mythical.

Kate Larson has done an excellent job of sorting out the facts. While the work is on Tubman, there is also a great deal of history about slavery and people that were adjacent to Tubman''s life. While the book is an excellent account of slavery in Maryland, less than half is actually devoted to Tubman. This is not a criticism of the book, but be prepared to learn a great deal about the life and times of the owners and their families and slavery in general. Larson also includes a historiography of Tubman and tells how other authors have depicted.

If you have to chose a biography of Tubman, this is the one to select.
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Clem
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Very good considering how little history knows about her
Reviewed in the United States on June 25, 2016
What do we really know about the woman who will soon grace the twenty-dollar bill? Sadly, we really don’t know much at all. One of the many heartbreaking consequences of slavery is not only the fact that human beings spent their entire lives in bondage, but that history... See more
What do we really know about the woman who will soon grace the twenty-dollar bill? Sadly, we really don’t know much at all. One of the many heartbreaking consequences of slavery is not only the fact that human beings spent their entire lives in bondage, but that history tells us almost nothing about these people. As the author so crudely (yet accurately) tells us, slaves were basically treated like horses. No records of birth nor death in many instances. Individuals were loaned out when others needed them and/or finances were particularly tough for an owner, and thought was rarely given to splitting up families. Just like horses or other livestock.

So it shouldn’t really be surprising that Harriet Tubman’s life has been passed down as more myth than accurate history. We simply don’t know many details. The author is very forthright in these matters. She takes meticulous care in explaining to the reader that one must do a lot of speculating when writing about such a person as Harriet Tubman. In fact, one could argue that she is forced to “fill many of the pages” with what we <I>do</I> know around slavery in order to get a more accurate picture. There were times when I forgot I was reading a book about Harriet Tubman and thought that I was reading about the institution of slavery as it existed in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. None of this really bothered me, however, other than the fact that such a travesty in any country’s history is always difficult to stomach. I have a hard time reading books about oppressed people. It’s so hard for me to comprehend how cruel people can be to one another.

So Tubman’s life probably mirrors many other lives of slaves. Her early life has her constantly being “loaned out” to temporary masters. Some are kinder than others, but the cruel ones are particularly ruthless. At one point, a “master” gets angry at a particular slave and throws an anvil at him. He misses, yet manages to hit Tubman instead and severely wound her. She survives, yet harbors the wound for her entire life. I mention this because Tubman believes she has an epiphany after the accident, goes into trances from time to time, and is convinced that God has chosen her to help redeem her people and help end slavery. Whether this revelation was truly divine, a result of an overactive imagination, or the consequence of a nasty head wound is debatable. Whatever the case, history now tells us that, celestial or accidental, this incident turned out to be a great thing.

The remarkable thing about Tubman is that once she escapes, she elects not to run further away, yet run <I>back</I> and rescue more and more slaves. This is obviously incredibly perilous. She never seems apprehensive, seems completely in control, and has incredible wits to manage such escapades with daring brilliance. She knows God will keep her safe. The book is filled with such dramatic escape tales, and if a movie is ever made about her, you can bet that some of these adventures would take up the bulk of the film. Again, when you don’t know much history, such dramatic events tend to stand out.

At the outbreak of the U.S. Civil War, Tubman continues to work strongly for the cause, aiding the Union army however possible. The book doesn’t really dwell too much on this area of her life, probably because much simply isn’t known. We then briefly read about her post Civil War days as she continues to be an activist – campaigning for universal suffrage. The book is also intertwined with many famous figures of U.S. History including Frederick Douglass, Susan B. Anthony and John Brown. All of these individuals Tubman works with in some capacity during her lifelong plight.

The biggest weakness of the book is that the author feels compelled to list every single individual by name that happens to be related to any of the incidents that occur in Tubman’s life. Example: If Tubman hides in a particular “safe house” during one of her escapes, the author will proceed to tell us the name of every individual that resided at the particular house, along with (what seemed like) an intense lengthy genealogy. This wouldn’t be a bad idea if such individuals had a more major role in the story, but when we never visit the particular safe house again, we wonder “what’s the point??”. My advice is to skip over most of the names and not try to catalog them in your brain as you read. Otherwise, your brain will soon become overloaded.

Overall a very good, powerful, necessary read. One really wishes, however, that we could know so much more about this true heroine.
31 people found this helpful
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Nick
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great read. Very educational and impactful.
Reviewed in the United States on July 4, 2019
Great read. We whites need to understand more about what hardships they endoured. This does it. And you learn about a women driven to help her family and other escape the forced labor incarceration farms and life threatening servitude of the south during a shameful period... See more
Great read. We whites need to understand more about what hardships they endoured. This does it. And you learn about a women driven to help her family and other escape the forced labor incarceration farms and life threatening servitude of the south during a shameful period of our country. She carried on her life after having her head bashed in, breaking her skull for no reason at all, crushing part of her brain, with no medical treatment given at all, sleeping on straw, trying to heal herself because she was not economically worth the price of a doctor''s care.

A great enduring women, oh and what a story. A must read for America.
A woman with a focused purpose of not wanting others to be harmed as she was.

God bless this brave woman
11 people found this helpful
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Mimi
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Couldn''t get past 50 pages in 2016, SEE UPDATE IN 2021!
Reviewed in the United States on July 24, 2016
I really wanted to love this book but it is too MASTER''S THESIS for me. I just couldn''t get in to it. I''d love to see the author, or another writer, re-write the whole book as a historical novel based on all of the research done. It would make a great book and would have... See more
I really wanted to love this book but it is too MASTER''S THESIS for me. I just couldn''t get in to it. I''d love to see the author, or another writer, re-write the whole book as a historical novel based on all of the research done. It would make a great book and would have wide appeal.

Fast forward to 5/2021. She did it! I just watched the 2019 movie Harriet. What an excellent movie! Five stars. I also discovered the author of this book, historian Kate Clifford Larson, did consult on the script for this movie. All of her research and expertise on Harriet Tubman was put to good use. If the heavy-duty detail of the book is too much for you, then definitely watch the movie. I’m going to go back and try to read the book now that I’ve seen the movie. Harriet is a fascinating person and a true hero. Sadly, It will most likely be 2030 before the Harriet Tubman $20 bill enters circulation.
17 people found this helpful
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Bookaunt
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Well done and worth the read
Reviewed in the United States on September 2, 2020
I can''t say enough good things about this book. What I did not realize about this author until just now when I was looking for her biography was that she was a consultant for the movie Harriet, which I loved so much I bought it and that is what lead me to looking for a... See more
I can''t say enough good things about this book. What I did not realize about this author until just now when I was looking for her biography was that she was a consultant for the movie Harriet, which I loved so much I bought it and that is what lead me to looking for a book about Harriet so I could learn more about her. This book did not disappoint in that matter. I liked how the author not only told more about Harriet but she also told about her family and other families that lived around where she did that she helped. This woman went through so much in her life but she always continued to help others before thinking of herself. This book is a must read in my opinion. Well done.
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Marilyn Hay
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
I''m glad Harriet Tubman has been chosen for the $20 and ...
Reviewed in the United States on April 27, 2016
This is an interesting historical record/account of the life and activities of this extraordinary woman. The book shines a light on those years before the Civil War in particular, and how slaves yearned for freedom despite what the owners would have the public believe.... See more
This is an interesting historical record/account of the life and activities of this extraordinary woman. The book shines a light on those years before the Civil War in particular, and how slaves yearned for freedom despite what the owners would have the public believe. Breaks my heart how badly so very many people were treated: brutalized, treated as less than human, families split and members sold away. I wish this dark history truly was in the past but the racism of today, the systemic racism of our society, the new slavery of our private prisons in the US ... we still have a very long way to go. We need to push harder for justice for all, a lot harder. I''m glad Harriet Tubman has been chosen for the $20 and wish her life story could be mandatory reading.
7 people found this helpful
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Kindle Customer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
What an amazing woman!
Reviewed in the United States on April 25, 2016
This book is long and sometimes hard to read. But, I a lot of people won''t persevere and actually want to learn about Harriet Tub--man. Absolutely amazing woman! This book is an eye opener...history does repeat itself over and over again from racial prejudice to women''s... See more
This book is long and sometimes hard to read. But, I a lot of people won''t persevere and actually want to learn about Harriet Tub--man. Absolutely amazing woman! This book is an eye opener...history does repeat itself over and over again from racial prejudice to women''s rights, even veterans benefits. I do not think that the honor of being on the $20 bill is good enough for this Black American veteran and Underground Railroad conductor. The woman''s spirit and faith made her an American Saint showing more christianity in her daily living than most of us in lifetime.
6 people found this helpful
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Myron M. Miller
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Tubman Story Rekindled
Reviewed in the United States on June 15, 2016
The author succeeds in providing a serious account with a labored effort to document the flow of a transformative life; Harriet Tubman''s complex contribution to American freedom history is well done. It is I fortunate that there are so many typographical "hiccups" filling... See more
The author succeeds in providing a serious account with a labored effort to document the flow of a transformative life; Harriet Tubman''s complex contribution to American freedom history is well done. It is I fortunate that there are so many typographical "hiccups" filling the pages with improperly hyphenated words and names. More serious is the dwelling on minutia of names of slave owners and the number and names of each of their slaves. The author''s intent to be thorough and careful in setting the stage for Tubman''s life, but four chapters of this begins to feel like reading the "begat" sections of the Bible.
3 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

EdnaBucketEatingChocolate
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent read
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 15, 2020
An excellent well written biography.
An excellent well written biography.
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P Simpson-Little
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 1, 2015
good
good
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Yo mismo
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Una gran historia sobre una gran mujer
Reviewed in Spain on September 12, 2015
Vamos a ver... No es una novela sino un libro de historia. Es decir, incluye un montón de detalles que no siempre parecen interesantes, y a veces te da la impresión de que hay personajes que aparecen no se sabe de donde, o que desaparecen sin aviso previo... Pero está muy...See more
Vamos a ver... No es una novela sino un libro de historia. Es decir, incluye un montón de detalles que no siempre parecen interesantes, y a veces te da la impresión de que hay personajes que aparecen no se sabe de donde, o que desaparecen sin aviso previo... Pero está muy bien. Harriet Tubman es un personaje que los americanos conocen durante su educación, pero que en España no ha tenido difusión. Y merece la pena conocerla.
Vamos a ver... No es una novela sino un libro de historia. Es decir, incluye un montón de detalles que no siempre parecen interesantes, y a veces te da la impresión de que hay personajes que aparecen no se sabe de donde, o que desaparecen sin aviso previo... Pero está muy bien.

Harriet Tubman es un personaje que los americanos conocen durante su educación, pero que en España no ha tenido difusión. Y merece la pena conocerla.
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H. Lynn Turner
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in Canada on March 28, 2017
An amazing woman! Wonderful book
An amazing woman! Wonderful book
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